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Brandeis University‚Äôs Independent Student Newspaper Since 1949 | Waltham, MA

Glen Chagi Chesir


Articles

Students receive grant to initiate dialogue at Al-Quds

This past week yet another development occurred in the suspended relationship between Brandeis and Al-Quds University as a Davis Project for Peace grant was awarded to Eli Phillip '15 and Catie Stewart '16 for their project proposal entitled "Al-Quds University Student Dialogue Initiative." According to the written proposal, "[t]he project will create a framework for long-term student dialogue between Brandeis University and Al-Quds University." This project has also been deemed consistent with University policy by the administration, despite the current suspension from this past November. The Projects for Peace program, now in its eighth year, began when benefactor Kathryn W.


Football embodies democratic government ideals

This past Sunday I had the honor and privilege to join hundreds of thousands of people across the country in what has become one of the greatest and most exhilarating moments in any American's life; attend a live National Football League game. A ticket costs more than I make in a month in my on-campus job and I may no longer be able to look at a potato knish the same way; they were the complimentary gift to the fans in our section. While sitting in traffic on the New Jersey Turnpike, after watching Eli Manning connect with Victor Cruz for the game-winning touchdown to beat the Washington Redskins, I reflected on how football has become an integral part of the American democratic culture. The 2012 Superbowl featuring the New York Giants and Boston's own New England Patriots set a third consecutive television record, drawing in 111.3 million viewers. To put that number in perspective, that is more viewers then the two presidential and one vice presidential campaign debates combined. The question must be asked: How did a such a game whose violence may be the cause of severe depression, anxiety and numerous attempted suicides of former players due to repeated undocumented concussions, become such a classic American pastime?


Football embodies democratic government ideals

This past Sunday I had the honor and privilege to join hundreds of thousands of people across the country in what has become one of the greatest and most exhilarating moments in any American's life; attending a live National Football League game. A ticket costs more than I make in a month in my on-campus job and I may no longer be able to look at a potato knish the same way; they were the complimentary gift to the fans in our section. While sitting in traffic on the New Jersey Turnpike, after watching Eli Manning connect with Victor Cruz for the game-winning touchdown to beat the Washington Redskins, I reflected on how football has become an integral part of the American democratic culture. The 2012 Superbowl featuring the New York Giants and Boston's own New England Patriots set the television record, drawing in 111.3 million viewers, for the third year in a row. To put that number in perspective, that is more viewers then the first two presidential, plus the vice presidential campaign debates combined. The question must be asked: How did a such a game whose violence may be the cause of severe depression, anxiety and numerous attempted suicides of former players due to repeated undocumented concussions, become such a classic American pastime?


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