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Brandeis University’s Independent Student Newspaper Since 1949 | Waltham, MA

Consider the risks involved in online grocery expansion

 Even though the giants of e-commerce are still experiencing notable revenue growth, firms can no longer earn a considerable profit by simply moving their retail business online. In the long run, due to the increasing ubiquity of online shopping and growing competition from startups, e-commerce firms will need to find new ways to gain an edge over competitors.  


Caution against ‘walk up, not out’ approach to gun violence

 Brandeis’ campus, along with many other high schools and universities across the nation, is filled with “socially awkward teenagers,” so that isn’t the issue. The issue is that he wanted to inflict pain on others, not that he was somehow misunderstood. Despite knowing that there are people targeting and killing others, the nation is still not taking proper action to prevent future atrocities.   


Condemn racism and divisiveness in political conversation

 The immediate controversy drawn was to the racial context, given that James is an African American professional athlete, and Ingraham is a white woman. This debate, regardless of its propensity to incite indignation, is ultimately tangential to the core issue that is besieging American discourse from all sides. There is an underlying lack of empathy and compassion in any contemporary debate.  


Commend the University for holding active shooter drill

 On March 21, the University will conduct an emergency preparedness drill on campus simulating an active shooter in the Brandeis Library. Through interactive role-play, this drill will test the University’s level of readiness should a real crisis of this nature unfold on campus. In light of similar shooter threats that have recently taken place both at Brandeis and at other educational institutions across the nation, this board commends the University’s proactive approach in fostering a safer and more protected community.  


Consider benefits of medical breakthroughs in reproductive health

According to a March 3 article in Time, this February, a woman from the United States gave birth to a baby after a successful uterine transplant — making her the second in the country to do so. The woman, who wished to withhold her identity, is part of an ongoing clinical trial at the Baylor University Medical Center to treat women with absolute uterine factor infertility, meaning that they have either a nonfunctional or nonexistent uterus. The first successful surgery was performed in 1999 by a team of doctors at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden. Since then, eight children have been born from women who had undergone a uterine transplant, according to the university’s website.  


Views on the News: Firearm Purchases

 President Donald Trump's apparent support for raising the minimum age to purchase a gun from 18 to 21 and a more rigorous system of background checks for all firearm purchases left many Republican lawmakers stunned, according to a Feb. 28 New York Times article. Gun control advocates say that these regulations are a first step in combating gun violence, while detractors allege they would fail to stop guns from getting in the hands of criminals. Are additional regulations the right step to take in order to reduce gun violence?  


Demand bipartisan solution to pervasive gun violence

I know very little about guns. However, I understand that something is wrong in America when there is gun violence — particularly in schools — that far exceeds that of many other countries. A study by the Academy for Critical Incident Analysis detailed in the Washington Post addressed this discrepancy. It examined school violence in 36 countries and concluded that approximately half of all occurrences with at least two victims happened in the United States from 2000 to 2010, and the vast majority of these incidents involved guns. Those 36 countries totaled to 3.8 billion residents in 2010, while the U.S. population accounts for less than one-tenth of this number at that time. America clearly has a unique problem.  


Condemn collection of ethnic data on government forms

In a recent Senate Intelligence Committee hearing, FBI director Christopher Wray said that Chinese spies are spreading throughout the United States as part of a “whole-of-society” threat. He claimed that every Chinese person is a suspected spy regardless of their affiliation with Chinese government and called for a whole-of-society response from Americans, according to a Feb. 13 Business Insider article.  He also said that the Chinese intelligence employs nontraditional collectors such as professors, scientists and students. They collected information not only in major cities but also small ones across basically every discipline.  


Acknowledge MakerLab’s contributions to the University

 This past week, the Brandeis MakerLab raised $6,000 through a crowdfunding campaign. Created in 2014, the MakerLab is central to much of Brandeis’ pursuit of new and emerging technologies, and is responsible for advances in the field of 3D printing, robotics and drones. This board recognizes the importance of the MakerLab and commends the Brandeis community members involved in this innovative campus resource.  


Encourage students to support Cupid Express fundraiser

As Valentine’s Day approaches, people express their love and affection for significant others, family and friends, often by buying flowers, chocolate or other gifts. This year, Graduate Student Affairs is holding a campus-wide fundraising initiative, Cupid Express, to benefit the Boston Area Rape Crisis Center. This board encourages the Brandeis community to participate in this worthy initiative by using Cupid Express as the one-stop-shop for buying roses and chocolate. 


Analyze effects of globalization on Egyptian market structures

The name of the game for many countries trying to grow their economy is globalization. An open, competitive market that gives the opportunity for increased efficiency, exports and investment has been the goal of many of these countries. But globalization potentially has an additional benefit to these growing nations: the shrinking of the informal sector, as can be seen in the globalization of the Egyptian economy. 


Acknowledge the faults in some modern forms of protest

My hometown became more diverse and began to experience growing pains. Our town was a red dot in Massachusetts’ blue sea: When my family first moved there, we were one of maybe 10 Indian families in a town of over 15,000. Now, Indian and Chinese families have flocked to our small, less multicultural replica of Lexington, drawn by the top-tier schools’ rankings, and one out of 10 Winchester citizens are Asian, according to demographic data from Neighborhood Scout.  


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