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Brandeis University’s Independent Student Newspaper Since 1949 | Waltham, MA

False Advertising with a side of fries

 On Saturday night, amidst several other art events occurring on campus this past weekend, a small  but enthusiastic group of students gathered in Pollack Hall for a mid-semester performance by False Advertising, Brandeis’ only musical improvisation group. 


False Advertising with a side of fries

 On Saturday night, amid several other art events occurring on campus this past weekend, a small  but enthusiastic group of students gathered in Pollack Fine Arts Teaching Center for a mid-semester performance by False Advertising, Brandeis’ only musical improvisation group. 


Solo-play invites introspection

 De Berry’s play is described in its program as “at once memoryscape and a mytho-biography,” but I find that to be an objective description which ignores the subjective experience of the audience. In my opinion, it is more accurate to call it an invitation. 


The Rose invites us to take a closer look

 On Wednesday, March 1, I attended the Rose Art Museum’s Spring Exhibitions Opening Celebration. The celebration presented the Rose’s three new exhibits: “Jennifer Packer: Tenderheaded” in the Gerald S. and Sandra Fineberg Gallery, “Praying For Time” in the Lower Rose and Foster Galleries and “Blueprint For Counter Education” in the Mildred S. Lee Gallery.  


‘Fukushima Mon Amour’ the merrier

 The Center for German and European Studies hosted a film night at the Wasserman Cinematheque on Feb. 28. The department screened “Fukushima Mon Amour,” a film following a 20-something German woman travelling to the site of the 2011 nuclear meltdown caused by a magnitude 9.0 earthquake. She goes to an adjacent temporary residence to entertain the remaining citizens who insisted on staying in their hometown. When she is tricked into bringing an old geisha back to her destroyed home a few kilometers away, the two rebuild the house in an attempt to escape their past mistakes. 


A feminist tale of a Greek tragedy

 The Brandeis Shakespeare Society, also known as Hold Thy Peace, put on an adaptation of playwright Ellen McLaughlin’s “Iphigenia and Other Daughters” this past weekend in the Shapiro Campus Center. 


BBSO celebrates Black culture and art

 February is Black History Month during which the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom celebrates the history of people involved with the African Diaspora is celebrated. Prior to “Shades of Blackness,” BBSO held multiple events geared toward Black culture, including a screening of  the movie “School Daze.” The festivities do not end anytime soon. BBSO plans to hold a screening of the Academy Award winning film, “Moonlight,” and will partner with Brandeis’ Latinx Student Organization to hold a meeting for Black and Latinx students. 


VoiceMale gets in the V-Day groove

 As Valentine’s Day comes around every February, we all look for songs to get us into a romantic mood. Often the songs are classical tunes — wordless, sometimes corny melodies replete with string sections. Very rarely, though, are Valentine’s Day songs lacking instruments. Brandeis’ all-male a cappella group VoiceMale sought to change that with its annual variety show “Lovapalooza,” which took place this past Saturday. “Lovapalooza,” however, delivered performances as diverse as the selection of discount candy after the holiday. 


Comedians challenge ’Deis PC culture

 This past Thursday evening, WBRS hosted its second comedy night this semester. Hosted by Josh Day, the event garnered a small, but lively audience.  Dim lighting, as per request of Day — who spent time fussing over the Goldilocks “just right” setting for lighting — set the tone of the evening. A larger-than-life poster of a somber-looking pup against the wall behind the stage added to this facetiously melancholy set. To start off the evening, Day joked that this was his dog, who he recently put down, and that a reminder of one’s dead childhood dog is a necessary component for laughter at a comedy show. The morbid, edging on macabre, theme of the first joke would continue throughout the night. 


Keaton reminds us to revisit the silent film era

 The screening of the 1924 film “Sherlock Jr.” was hosted by the History of Ideas program. The organizer, academic administrator Julie Seeger (PHIL), invited students and faculty to “A Night at the Movies,” one in a series of three movie nights throughout the semester. This first one was, in part, also a celebration of Prof. John Plotz’s (ENG) new book, “Semi-Detached: The Aesthetics of Virtual Experience since Dickens.”  


TBA is a must-see this semester

 On Wednesday evening, the TBA Improv and Sketch Comedy group put on its first show of the semester. From start to finish, the show was full of laughs; the audience, about 40 students, was drawn in for the entirety of the two hours.  


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