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Brandeis University’s Independent Student Newspaper Since 1949 | Waltham, MA

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Shaping her own

(01/29/19 11:00am)

Destiny Morton ’20 never expected to set foot on a college campus. Growing up in a family where no one was a college graduate and with multiple suspensions under her belt by the time she was a high school freshman, Morton did not see herself entering the world of higher education. 



The final(s) frontier

(12/11/18 11:00am)

When Alex Chang ’22 studies, he is usually gulping down a black coffee in the Quiet Study Area, colloquially known as ‘the Dungeon’ around campus, while listening to Metallica. The Dungeon is where students are careful to be as quiet as possible, with some even monitoring the noise of their typing, so as to not disturb the silent environment. 


Model Student

(12/04/18 11:00am)

Ira Bornstein ’22 doesn’t have a clear memory of when his passion for fashion started. But his love for clothing has earned him­— @yvngiraa — nearly 2,500 Instagram followers. At Brandeis, Bornstein is interested in studying business with an emphasis on fashion. His love of fashion and interest in business is exemplified by his hobby of reselling clothes.



Is it time for unity?

(11/13/18 11:00am)

     This midterm election season brought forth the rise of diverse candidates and winners: from Massachusetts’ own Ayanna Pressley, the first African-American woman to represent the state in Congress, to the election of Andy Kim, the first Korean-American Democrat in Congress. While the 2018 election cycle had record-breaking numbers of diverse winners, it also was the most expensive, with House candidates alone raising more than $1 billion dollars. Since the 1980s, the increasing role of money in politics is just one of the reasons for our increasingly polarized political climate, according to Massachusetts State Senator Adam Hinds.


Identity Awareness

(10/30/18 10:00am)

Not long ago, domestic violence was regarded as a family issue. When police responded to a domestic disturbance call, they often told abusers to just take a walk. With the passage of the Violence Against Women Act of 1991, domestic violence shifted from being a “family” matter to a national, political issue. However, the criminalization of domestic violence did not solve the problem. And as people are increasingly entering and being abused in romantic relationships that are not heteronormative, the perceptions and discourse surrounding domestic violence have to change, according to a domestic violence panel.